Post Falls’ sunny day in the snow

Post Falls escaped the indoors today on their snow science field trip to Mt. Spokane State Park. Students snowshoed a mile up to the Bald Mountain picnic area where they worked with a variety of community partners to dig snow pits and collect data.

Thank you to everyone who came out to help!

Kat Hall – Lands Council; Becky Rittenburg, Zion Klos, Kathleen Torso, Marie Pengilly & Jim Ekins – UI; Brendan Jackson; Laura Laumatia – Coeur d’Alene Tribe; Jamie Brunner – DEQ; Dan Frigard – USFS

We made the Coeur d’Alene Press!

http://www.cdapress.com/news/local_news/article_7f86b998-7605-54b7-823e-6025f7fec094.html

IMG_0354 IMG_0349 IMG_0292 Claire Forsberg3 Claire Forsberg2 Claire Forsberg

Students, please reflect on these questions in the comment section. Answer all of them and leave your first name and last initial.

1.) What is the most valuable thing you learned on the snow science trip?

2.) How does snowpack impact you and your community?

3.) What was your favorite part of the day?

4.) What adult did you work closely with and what did you learn from him/her?

5.) In our effort to show how biology intertwines with English, what did you find on the trip that relates to Julius Caeser? Send your photo to asquires@uidaho.edu.

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Post Falls’ sunny day in the snow

  1. 1) The most valuable thing I learned on our trip to Mt. Spokane was the value of accurately testing snowpack. I had no idea there was so much to learn about the snow that I’ve played on for years. I also learned the value of friends that are willing to try new things!

    2) For those playing in the snow, snowpack is important to determine the risk for avalanches so that we can avoid these situations. Also, we need to be able to determine how much water will be available in the watershed from snowpack runoff.

    3) I loved being able to experience the outdoors as a class! It was such an experience and a lot of people got to go snowshoeing for their first time. Between all the science, we had a great time playing in the snow and talking to the guides and adults on the trip.

    4) Zion helped my group, He was a grad student from Unviversity of Idaho. He helped us out with the tests themselves. As we did the temperature reading, he told us that because the reading was 0.0 degrees Celsius all the way to the ground, our snowpack had most likely already started to melt and was ready to move.

    5) We built a twig crown for Kami, one of our group members, like the one Caesar wore.

    -Claire Forsberg

  2. 1.) What is the most valuable thing that I learned on the snow science trip?
    How to save someone from an avalanche.
    2.) How does snowpack impact me and my community?
    It impacts how big the river gets and if there is going to be a flood of a drought.
    3.) What was my favorite part of the day?
    Snowshoeing up and down the mountain.
    4.) What adult did I work closely with and what did I learn from him/her?
    Dan, he taught us how to dig a hole the right way in the snow if you want to record data.

  3. 1.) The most valuable thing I learned on the snow trip was how important the snowfall is to our watershed
    2.) Snow pack affects our community by the amount of water in our watersheds. The more the snowfall, the more water will be available to us throughout the summer.
    3.) My favorite part of the day was when we climbed up the hill. Even though it was hard and painful, it was my first time snowshoeing and a lot of fun!
    4.) I worked closely with Kat. She was able to help us learn how to accurately use the tools to receive the most accurate data. She was lots of help and was able to teach us about how the snow is an important part of our watershed.
    5.) It showed me that with little amounts of snowfall less water will be available in the year. This will affect all of our recreational activities and our farming resources.

  4. 1. The most valuable thing I learned from the trip is how important the snowpack is since it becomes our drinking water, swimming water, farming water, etc.
    2. The snowpack influences me and my community because it determines how much water we will have in the watershed for drinking, farming, etc.
    3. My favorite part of the day was snowshoeing and taking pictures along the way.
    4. Our group worked with Kat the most. She helped us find a nice place for our snowpit and use our equipment correctly.
    5. I now understand that the amount of snowfall affects the amount of water we will have in the summer.

  5. 1.) The most valuable thing I learned was that the snow is warmer towards the ground because the earth heats it.
    2.) It affects how much water we get.
    3.) The best part was digging a pit and testing the snow.
    4.) Kat helped us understand how to use the tools and correctly collect data.
    5.) It helped me understand how important the snowpack is.

  6. 1) The most valuable thing I learned on this snow trip is that snow gets warmer as it gets closer to the ground or Earth.
    2) The snowpack impacts me and the community by melting into the water that we drink, swim in, clean in, and much more. Also, enough of it can help prevent fires.
    3) My favorite part of the day was being outside in the nice, sunny weather.
    4) The adult my group worked with was Kat, and she helped us to understand why snow is warmer when it’s closer to the Earth.
    5) Today’s field work influenced my understanding of water resources by showing me that we do need snow. I used to not want snow (and I still don’t like it), but now I realize how important it is that we get enough for water later on.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s