St. Maries Student Reflections for the 2014-2015 Benewah Creek Field Trip

Students, please write a short piece about your thoughts on the Benewah Creek field trip. Some questions you may want to answer in your responses are:

What is the most valuable thing you learned from the experience?

How does water quality impact you and your community?

In what ways was today’s field work experience similar to typical science labs in school? How was it different? What was your favorite part about the trip?

How did the experience shape your understanding of science careers?

Did the experience influence your understanding of water resources?

Please provide your first name when writing your piece.

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27 thoughts on “St. Maries Student Reflections for the 2014-2015 Benewah Creek Field Trip

  1. Jordan:
    The most valuable thing I learned during the water quality check in The Confluence Project was that water affects everyone. If the water is polluted then plants and animals in turn become polluted.
    Water quality impacts the community in many ways. If the water is bad than the community is affected with pollutants, but if the water is clean than we in turn will have good water and and unpolluted fish and plants.
    My favorite part of the field work was taking data on the stream. It made me feel like I was having actual field experience.

  2. Gabrielle:
    The most valuable thing that I learned during the field trip was the way that the Native American people lived. It was amazing to see how different people lived a long time ago and how they used their resources that they had such as the fish and creeks. Water quality is also very important to me and my community. We eat and swim in the same rivers and creeks all the time. The water quality is important because you don’t want to swim in dirty water! My favorite part was probably hearing the old stories that were told and that was really cool to hear.

  3. My name is Mallory. The most valuable thing I learned from my experience is that you have to be careful with what you do with water. A lot of things can harm the water and you need to think before you act. There are many ways the water quality impacts our community. If the water is dirty the organisms can’t live in it and they die. We also can;t use it because the water is bad. There were ways collecting this data was similar to working with it in a lab, but also very different. One way it wasn’t similar was that we would actually collect the examples. In ways it was similar is we would still study the examples.

  4. Emma,
    The area that we researched, Benewah creek was a part of a meander. A meander is constructed big curves that slow down the current. This helps the fish survive because the water doesn’t kick up dirt to make it hard for fish to find food.

    The site that my group studied was a riffle. A riffle is a shallow area to control rocks. Larger rocks poking out of the shallow water helps the water get more oxygen in the water. This helps the fish breathe.

    Recharging ground water helps floods so that fish can swim through. This is monitored through a meter length water well. That shows how high the water levels can reach. The average depth of a pool was two feet deep.

    Apart of the reconstruction of the stream was to move in jogs to slow the rate of the shore was sloping. Also if the landscape had roots and plants to keep the soil in place, then it would not need to have the supporting logs out in.

    The Benewah County restoration is helping bring back native fish such as cutthroat trout. They have brought in shade, so fish don’t just have thermal refugee for there only safe, cool place. The meanders to slow down the current, so the fish can see and eat. Some of the creek is naturally restored by beavers, but a lot of the restoration is effecting the cleansing of the water and repopulation of native fish possitivly.

  5. This experience shaped how I understand about water that it matters a lot. Without it we would all die. So we need to take care of it. This also helped me realize that science careers actually are helpful. That they help us to know what’s going on and to know how to deal with it. I liked this experience a lot better than being in a lab because I actually got to see and be in the site that I was testing and get a better understanding of it. Zack.

  6. Toni:
    The thing that I value the most is water quality. I learned that only certain organisms can live in dirty water. All organisms need clean water to survive. Water quality impacts my community and me because we live off of the water. We swim in it and our wildlife drinks out of it. Without clean water we wouldn’t be able to survive.Science class and field work is really different. In science class we study organisms and how clean water is. In the field we actually get to see the water and see the environment that surrounds it.

  7. My name is Kelsey. Water quality impacts myself and my community greatly. It effects the water we swim in. It also effects the fish and many other organisms that are in our lakes, rivers, streams, etc. You need to have good water quality to survive. The field trip was similar because we have tested water before. It was different because there were many more things to test about the water. I also thought it was very different with the electroshocking of the fish. My favorite part of the field trip was electroshocking the fish. It was cool to see the fish get shocked and swim almost right into the net. We caught some really big fish and also really small ones.

  8. Kaylene:
    I had a really great time on out field trip to Benewah Creek. I learned many things such as: the higher the water quality is the more macroinvertebrates there will be, or that the more shaded the water is the lower the temperature of it will be in turn there will be more dissolved oxygen which is very important.
    Water quality also impacts our community. If the water quality is low, our community will be affected with polluted water, and that could cause us to become sick. If the water quality is high, then the people of our community can use the water for recreational purposes and eat some of the organisms that come from it.

  9. The most valuable thing I learned was how to determine if a water resource is polluted or not. Its really quite easy, you can analyze the types of macroinvertebrates, look for algal blooms, or simply look at the water’s clarity. Water affects us in nearly every aspect of life. We use it for agriculture, recreation, etc.

  10. Aspen:
    The most important thing that I learned today was how to take better care of our environment. I got to learn about all kinds of careers that have to do with the water. Water quality impacts our community by our river that runs through our town. If the river wasn’t clean we wouldn’t be able to swim, fish, or boat. In science labs we looked at other living organisms like when we looked for macro invertebrates. It was different by we were actually outside doing actual research.

  11. My name is Liz. My favorite part of the field work was dissecting the fish because i learned the physical differences in the different types of fish. Brook trout are significantly different from cutthroat trout inside and out. The field work influenced my personal viewpoint and understanding because i know so much more, and I can use this knowledge in the future.

  12. Ryker The most valuable thing I learned was how to test if water was of good quality. If we don’t have good quality water than our community can’t thrive to its fullest. Without good water than we can use the water. It was similar to when we checked water for an algae bloom to see if the water is useable. It is different because we had all day to work on the project instead of one hour. My favorite part of the day was when we check the qualities of water. After the field trip I have a better understanding of what scientist in hydrology do daily. I also have a better understanding of how important our water is.

  13. The area that we researched, Benewah creek was a part of a meander. A meander is constructed big curves that slow down the current. This helps the fish survive because the water doesn’t kick up dirt to make it hard for fish to find food.

    The site that my group studied was a riffle. A riffle is a shallow area to control rocks. Larger rocks poking out of the shallow water helps the water get more oxygen in the water. This helps the fish breathe.

    Recharging ground water helps floods so that fish can swim through. This is monitored through a meter length water well. That shows how high the water levels can reach

  14. The most valuable thing i learned was how water quality can effect people and animals greatly.
    Water quality can affect me and my community because if the water was dirty the fish could not survive.Then the animals that use to eat this fish would not have food to eat, and he people that eat the fish would not be able too. My favorite part about the field work was the eletroshocking of the fish. I never knew that the fish would come to the positive side of the device like a magnet.

  15. On the field trip we looked at water quality and ways to make it better. Water quality affects our community in many different ways. It determines vegetation growth, animal quality, and air quality. During the field trip I had two favorite parts. The first one was when we electroshocked fish and caught them. Some we tagged and released, and some we dissected. The dissection part was my second favorite. The field trip has influenced my personal viewpoint of water resources and quality. It showed me how much water quality affects everything in and around the water.

  16. Mattea:
    The most valuable thing that I learned is that beavers have a major role in maintaining our environment. I learned that when beavers build dams it helps to control the grading of the stream. I also learned that beavers help control the hydrology of the stream. Overall I learned that beavers are amazing at taking care of the environment and it’s only their natural instincts that take care of the environment.

    My favorite part of the field trip was electroshocking fish. I liked that part because it was a very cool experience and I learned that the electro current in the water attracts the fish to you and then you can catch them in a net easier. It was an awesome experience and I learned more about electroshocking fish in one day than I would have in my hole life.

    The field trip has influenced my understanding of how oxygen and nutrients influence the water quality. Before the field trip I knew that nutrients and oxygen were important, but I didn’t know that little nutrients could effect a creek in such a large way. I learned that with little nutrients almost nothing can survive. Which I didn’t know before the field trip.

  17. Kyle:
    I learned a lot of interesting things on our Benewah Creek field trip. Water quality impacts our community in that there are more animals and a better environment around better quality water. The most valuable thing I learned was that restoration creek projects do help improve water quality downstream from the site. My favorite part about the day was testing the water for macro invertebrates to see how high quality the water environment was.

  18. My name is Stephen Davenport. My favorite part of the field was learning about how beavers affect the ecosystem, almost every part of it from the water levels, the trees or the types of fish and how many fish.

    The water qualities affect the fishing and hunting in our community. The fishing is affected because fish normally live in higher qualities of water and without fish, you cant go fishing. Hunting is affected because plants need water to grow and stay alive, game eat the plants, humans go hunting for game.

    I now understand water plays a huge affect in any ecosystem.

  19. My name is Hunter. I learned a lot of information about water quality. Before this field trip I knew little about water quality and how it effected our community. Our community uses the lake, rivers, and streams for many uses during the summer. It is good to know that people are out there devoting their time and money trying to restore it to how the water used to be. It was also the first time I heard of eletroshocking fish. It was very fun and I learned a lot.

  20. Gage:
    I had a great time on our field trip to Benewah Creek. My favorite part of the trip was watching the hydrologist shock the fish and catch the fish with a net. I learned that the water quality highly impacts the food web, because if the insects can’t survive in the water then the cutthroat can’t survive. The field experience helped me, because I got to see a different side of science that was more entertaining and it helped me understand how the things we learn in class relate to our everyday lives.

  21. My name is Maddie. I learned a lot at the field trip my honors biology class went on the Benewah Creek. I learned about how the fisherman electroshock the fish, so they can pit tag the Cut-throat trout. I also learned about the insides of a fish look when we disected the Brooke trout. I two people help my group classify macroinvertebrates and find the quality of the water. The water was clean and I learned a lot on the field trip.

  22. Makayla
    The most valuable thing that I learned on this field experience would be how to test pH levels. I say this because the pH scale is telling you how acidic or basic the water is, and I learned that you want the pH level near the middle(more neutral) because if it is to high on either side you could be in serious trouble.

    The water quality is super important for the community because if your drinking water is poor quality you probably do not want to consume it. So testing the water quality and knowing the water quality for the community is a GREAT thing to know. Water quality is important to the community.

    The field work that we did today explained many things about understanding water resources because the field work proved to me that there are many “rituals” that you have to do to test water in general.

  23. My name is Kiefer. My favorite part of the field experience was learning about the fish migration, especially about the cutthroat trout. I learned about their migration from Benewah Creek all the way down to the creek and into the lake. The restoration project on the creek is making a big difference for the fish. It is improving the water quality to make the organisms living in the creek live better. I learned about how the Tribe tags the fish and keeps track of the population numbers and sees whether they are declining or increasing.

    The Restoration Project is making a big difference on the whole creek. It is making the life of the organism there better and I now understand about the Native Cutthroat trout and their way of life.

  24. My name is Cori. The most valuable thing that I learned is how they tag fish. If we didn’t tag certain fish, we wouldn’t know if the fish react to the restored habitat. Water quality impacts us and our community because when the water is dirty then the fish wouldn’t be able to live that long in the water. When other animals drink or live in the water would also get sick and possibly die. This field experience helped me understand that the people who work in water resources actually get to go out and physically test it hands on and not on a computer or in paperwork.

  25. My name is Tristan. I think the most important thing to know is the water quality and how it effects everything around it. Looking for different insects, looking at the turbidity, and what is surrounding the creek are all things that need to be examined to better determine the quality of water.

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